The new austerity

Congressional Republicans have been working hard to cut SNAP funding (Food Stamps). As we know, Vice Presidential candidate Paul Ryan has worked very hard on this matter, having made his name nationally with his draconian budget proposal. While the Republican effort to cut Food Stamp funding is unsurprising, their effort remains disturbing nonetheless given the severity and length of the economic crisis which emerged in 2008 and given the looming food crisis. To be sure, the food crisis directly ahead of us will be a consequence of the 2012 drought. The existence of the drought belongs with the other effects produced by global warming, an issue on which the Republicans have an irrational position. As more Americans find themselves jobless or food-deprived and while the morbidity attributable to food-shortages will surely increase because of inflating food prices and food shortages, the Republican Party wants to intensify the deprivation many Americans will suffer by cutting Food Stamp funding.

What the Republican Party wants to impose on America is not a sound fiscal regime but an intense and risk-laden class war.

A damning judgment of Boehner’s recent budget

Robert Greenstein of the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities wrote:

House Speaker John Boehner’s new budget proposal would require deep cuts in the years immediately ahead in Social Security and Medicare benefits for current retirees, the repeal of health reform’s coverage expansions, or wholesale evisceration of basic assistance programs for vulnerable Americans.

The plan is, thus, tantamount to a form of “class warfare.” If enacted, it could well produce the greatest increase in poverty and hardship produced by any law in modern U.S. history.

This may sound hyperbolic, but it is not. The mathematics are inexorable.

And:

In short, the Boehner plan would force policymakers to choose among cutting the incomes and health benefits of ordinary retirees, repealing the guts of health reform and leaving an estimated 34 million more Americans uninsured, and savaging the safety net for the poor. It would do so even as it shielded all tax breaks, including the many lucrative tax breaks for the wealthiest and most powerful individuals and corporations.

President Obama has said that, while we must reduce looming deficits, we must take a balanced approach. The Boehner proposal badly fails this test of basic decency. The President should veto the bill if it reaches his desk. Congress should find a fairer, more decent way to avoid a default.

Just to remind ourselves of our current situation, the current and prospective Federal debt has not produced a fiscal crisis, Social Security is not in trouble, the United States has one of the lowest tax to GDP ratios of all the OECD countries and an austerity budget can trigger a severe economic contraction during a time of high-unemployment. This whole ‘debate’ is class war in its simplest and vilest form. It is a war that the rich are winning, as Warren Buffet pointed out.