The Oakland Police Officers’ Association speaks

They are confused, and want clarity.

The source document can be found here. I have reproduced it below:

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More on the Banksters and their personal security firm

I find the close relationship between New York City finance capital and the New York City Police Department disturbing, to put it mildly. After all, polities have police departments to promote a public order congenial to everyone. It is clear, however, that the NYPD does not pursue that goal. As Pam Martens explained:

Wall Street’s audacity to corrupt knows no bounds and the cooptation of government by the 1 per cent knows no limits. How else to explain $150 million of taxpayer money going to equip a government facility in lower Manhattan where Wall Street firms, serially charged with corruption, get to sit alongside the New York Police Department and spy on law abiding citizens.

According to newly unearthed documents, the planning for this high tech facility on lower Broadway dates back six years. In correspondence from 2005 that rests quietly in the Securities and Exchange Commission’s archives, NYPD Commissioner Raymond Kelly promised Edward Forst, a Goldman Sachs’ Executive Vice President at the time, that the NYPD “is committed to the development and implementation of a comprehensive security plan for Lower Manhattan…One component of the plan will be a centralized coordination center that will provide space for full-time, on site representation from Goldman Sachs and other stakeholders.”

Moreover:

At the time [2005], Goldman Sachs was in the process of extracting concessions from New York City just short of the Mayor’s first born in exchange for constructing its new headquarters building at 200 West Street, adjacent to the World Financial Center and in the general area of where the new World Trade Center complex would be built. According to the 2005 documents, Goldman’s deal included $1.65 billion in Liberty Bonds, up to $160 million in sales tax abatements for construction materials and tenant furnishings, and the deal-breaker requirement that a security plan that gave it a seat at the NYPD’s Coordination Center would be in place by no later than December 31, 2009.

The name for this corporate welfare hotel: The Lower Manhattan Security Coordination Center. The name of the program: The Lower Manhattan Security Initiative (LMSI). In the NYPD’s own words:

The Lower Manhattan Security Initiative (LMSI) is a networked surveillance project designed to detect threats and perform pre-operational terrorist surveillance south of Canal Street in Lower Manhattan. LMSI combines an increased police presence with technology to accomplish its mission. At the heart of this initiative is the public-private partnership fostered amongst the NYPD, private entities, and public agencies in Lower Manhattan to create an information sharing environment and better defend against potential threats to the nation’s financial capital. The Lower Manhattan Security Coordination Center (LMSCC), staffed 24/7 by NYPD officers, recently opened in November 2008 and serves as the central intake facility for all information gathered by the surveillance technology deployed south of Canal Street. Private and public partners are offered seats in the Coordination Center’s Operations Center.

The banksters have their eyes on you! And there you were with your silly belief that you were anonymous when you bugalooed down Broadway. You say you gave the finger to The Bull! Caught!

Martens concluded with:

Wall Street is infamous for perverting everything it touches: from the Nasdaq stock market, to stock research issued to the public, to auction rate securities, mortgages sold to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, credit default swaps with AIG, and mortgage securitizations. Had a public hearing been held on this massive surveillance sweep of Manhattan by potential felons, hopefully someone might have pondered what was to prevent Wall Street from tracking its employee whistleblowers heading off to the FBI offices or meeting with a reporter.

One puzzle has at least been solved. Wall Street’s criminals have not been indicted or sent to jail because they have effectively become the police.

A Bloomberg family friend briefly demonstrated for the public the surveillance system and its capabilities:

Quote of the day

The plaza of Zuccotti Park.

The plaza of Zuccotti Park.

Michael Kimmelman of the New York Times used the ongoing occupation of Liberty Plaza (Zuccotti Park) in New York City to discuss the political degradation of public space in America as well as, but less obviously, the local political community which formed in Liberty Plaza during the occupation:

Much as it can look at a glance like a refugee camp in the early morning, when the protesters are just emerging from their sleeping bags, Zuccotti Park has in fact become a miniature polis, a little city in the making. That it happens also to be a private park is one of the most revealing subtexts of the story. Formerly Liberty Park, the site was renamed in 2006 after John E. Zuccotti, chairman of Brookfield Office Properties, the park’s owner. A zoning variance granted to Brookfield years ago requires that the park, unlike a public, city-owned one, remain open day and night.

This peculiarity of zoning law has turned an unexpected spotlight on the bankruptcy of so much of what in the last couple of generations has passed for public space in America. Most of it is token gestures by developers in return for erecting bigger, taller buildings. Think of the atrium of the I.B.M. tower on Madison Avenue and countless other places like it: “public” spaces that are not really public at all but quasi-public, controlled by their landlords. Zuccotti in principle is subject to Brookfield’s rules prohibiting tarps, sleeping bags and the storage of personal property on the site. The whole situation illustrates just how far we have allowed the ancient civic ideal of public space to drift from an arena of public expression and public assembly (Speakers’ Corner in Hyde Park, say) to a commercial sop (the foyer of the Time Warner Center).

The reasons corporations shun pure public space should be obvious. Public space is part of the commons, and few corporations consider every citizen of a country to be a member of their target markets. Indeed, they typically seek to control access to their quasi-public spaces because they fear so many, and seek to exclude them as unworthy of entering space they consider to be a part of their domain. Some of these quasi-public spaces are little more than cordon sanitaires meant to separate the safe space within from the dangerous space without. Liberty Park is not a cordon sanitaire but an economic convenience given by the city to a private corporation, one which a fraction of the public could put to good public use!

The polis endures!

Occupy Wall Street visits Times Square

Occupy Wall Street travels to Midtown

Lech Wałęsa plans to visit Occupy Wall Street

The New York Daily News reported (h/t Phoenix Woman) that Lech Wałęsa intends to travel to New York City in order to meet with the Occupy Wall Street protesters. Wałęsa — an electrician, trade unionist, leader of the now iconic Solidarność, Nobel Peace Prize winner and former President of Poland — supports the Occupy Wall Street movement and will show his support by traveling to meet with the protesters. According to the Daily News, Mathew Blair, an organizer with Occupy Wall Street, invited Wałęsa to come to America and to Liberty Plaza.

A council appears and speaks

The document found below the break was authored and democratically approved by the NYC General Assembly, the political body which originated in the #occupywallstreet protest. So that there is no mistake about this matter, I wish to point out that the appearance of this document should not be construed as a response to those protest critics who assailed the protest for lacking focus. Rather, the Declaration of the NYC General Assembly should be identified as the product generated by a movement-in-formation and by a direct form of democratic will-formation. Neither conform well to soundbite journalism that is common today. Members of the press will fail to appreciate the nature of this kind of popular politics if they compare it to the many well-organized and scripted events produced by Astroturf organizations. As Gil Scott Heron memorably put it: “The revolution will not be televised.” It will not because television can only record the effects a revolution produces, not the revolutionary event itself! The revolutionary event merely refers to the gathering of and communication between like minds who will no longer tolerate injustice.

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Irene in New York City

Having lived in NYC for many years, I find rubbernecking too difficult to resist.

The Manhattan skyline

Battary Park City

 

West side of Manhattan

Waterfall in Central Park